April Speaker Series – A Visit to Toronto’s First Post Office in 1834

It is difficult for our 21st century selves to contemplate a time when handwriting was the only means of sending a thought any distance. When Toronto incorporated as a City in 1834, it was already a bustling capital of just over 9000 inhabitants, most of whom were recent immigrants, having left family and friends across borders and oceans. But the new city was remote, and isolated. And if these residents wanted to communicate farther than shouting distance, there was only one way – by putting it in writing.

Join Zoé Delguste-Cincotta, Curator at Toronto’s First Post Office, for this illustrated presentation which will highlight the history of the postal service in the Town of York and the building and operation of the first Post Office in the city of Toronto.

The event is free to attend, but donations are kindly accepted (suggested $5/person)

April’s Speaker Series is taking place on Tuesday, April 20, at 7pm, via Zoom. Registration in advance is required.

Speaker Series Review – Inside the Museums

October saw another successful Speaker Series, when we welcomed author John Goddard, discussing his latest publication Inside the Museums: Toronto’s Heritage Sites and Their Most Prized Objects.  It was a great night learning about the heritage sites in Toronto that tell the city’s history, about those who resided in the historic houses, and about the treasures that can be found within.

Many thanks to John Goddard for speaking to the Society and to the members who attended.  We hope it has inspired those to visit the fantastic museums found in Toronto.

Membership co-ordinator Lisa Terech addressing the crowd

Membership co-ordinator Lisa Terech addressing the crowd

Author John Goddard discussing the Toronto Museums

Author John Goddard discussing the Toronto Museums

Goddard addressing the crowd

Goddard addressing the crowd

Author John Goddard and his publication, Inside the Museums

Author John Goddard and his publication, Inside the Museums